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Air crash remains

Two small wooden crosses standing over a collection of metal machinery, close to Shining Tor, commemorate a tragic air accident that occurred at this very spot in March 1944.

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4. The chase

“…a suspicion arose that these three fellows had been concerned in the deed, and upon examining their old cloathes, they were found much stained with blood.”

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3. The inquest

“On Saturday week, an Inquest was held at the Cock Inn, Whaley, on the body of this unfortunate man, who was found barbarously murdered on the old road from Disley to Whaley-Bridge…”

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2. Innocent or guilty?

Did 17-year-old Joseph Dale, described in court as “a very peaceable, quiet lad, always good tempered and kind to his family”, pay the ultimate price for a murder he did not commit?

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Taxal Bridge

A photo captioned ‘View of footbridge over stream (possibly Goyt Valley) c.1854’ was a fascinating find. But identifying where it once stood wasn’t so easy. Could it have been the one over the Goyt at Taxal?

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Grimshawe vault sealed

Mr Oyarzibel took the opportunity of denying the stories that the bodies of the Grimshaws in the vault are embalmed in glass-topped coffins, and that the corpses still wear gold watch chains…

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1. The Murder Stone

This small, stone memorial, on the back road between Whaley Bridge and Disley, commemorates William Wood who was murdered at this very spot nearly two centuries ago. It’s a gruesome tale!

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Buried treasure!

A wonderful tale of a loveable Whaley Bridge rogue who won a bet with the Disley police. And also hunted for the Grimshawe’s treasure which was said to be buried close to Errwood Hall.

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Cheshire tithe maps

Alec has discovered a wonderful website that reveals a lot about the history of the Cheshire side of the Goyt Valley. Including the position of the second Stonyway Toll House.

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Goyt’s Moss Farmhouse

Another photo from the 1960s album shows Goyt’s Moss Farm in ruins. Which is odd as that this would mean it had been derelict for some 30 years. Perhaps the photo is earlier than I thought.

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Goyt ice skating

An early ’60s black and white photo of skaters on the frozen pond at the head of the Bunsall Incline brings back memories of an earlier scene, described in Strephon’s typically flowery style in an 1880 article.

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Goyt’s Bridge dreamer

A wonderful early photo of Goyt’s Bridge seems to tell an intriguing tale. Why is the young lady so wrapped up in her thoughts, as her men-folk look on, separated by the waters of the Goyt?

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Stonyway update

After much discussion on the Goyt Valley Facebook Group, we think we’ve finally nailed down where the first Stonyway Toll Booth once stood. But where it was moved to is still a mystery!

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“Lest we forget!!”

“Lest we forget!!” is handwritten on this 1918 postcard of the road from Derbyshire Bridge to Goytsclough. I’m hoping someone may be able to decipher the message on the reverse.

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Milestones update

I don’t know whether it’s my failing eyesight, but I didn’t notice inscriptions on both the milestones on the Old Macclesfield Turnpike. But they were well-hidden.

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Stonyway toll gate

This toll booth was one of five on the first Buxton to Macclesfield turnpike, forcing poorly-paid locals to pay a small tax for passing through the gates. Unsurprisingly, they were highly unpopular.

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Turnpike milestones

A recent talk in Buxton on milestones inspired me to go in search of any of these small roadside markers that lie close to the Goyt Valley, alongside the old turnpikes.

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Derbyshire Bridge

A signpost beside the Cat & Fiddle points towards Derbyshire Bridge at the southern end of the Goyt Valley. But this is Goyt’s Moss. And the bridge is further along the road towards the twin reservoirs.

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Colliery: then & now

An old OS map reveals a wealth of fascinating detail on what was once a busy colliery on the outskirts of Buxton, where coal was unloaded from tunnels extending as far as Goyt’s Moss, over a mile away.

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Goyt colliery

It’s hard to believe today but this quiet spot, beside the Old Macclesfield Road just outside Burbage, was once a busy colliery where coal was unloaded from small boats onto railway wagons.

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‘Accidental death’ verdict

I was with the deceased, Thomas Dunn, and when we arrived at my gate I asked if I should go forward with him as it was very dark. He said “Heaven bless thee, George, I shall manage.”

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Drunk in charge

He fell back upon some hay, also on to a child. Witness stopped him, and said he could not allow him to drive in a state like that. Defendant said “He had been a sight worse than this many a time.”

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Fatal trap accident

At 12 o’clock on Thursday night (18th May 1884) a sad and fatal accident happened at the top of Long Hill, about three miles from Buxton, whereby Mr. Thomas Dunn, of the Nook Farm, Fernilee, lost his life.

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Three Shires Head walk

With the weather turning wet and windy, I thought it a good time to hunker down and catch up with a couple of walks I’ve photographed, but not posted. Starting with Three Shires Head.

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